Sea & Mountain

Vama Veche

It was founded in 1811 by a few Gagauz families, originally being named "Ilanlîk". Its current name literally means "Old border checkpoint", named so after Southern Dobruja (the Cadrilater) had been included in Romania in 1913. In 1940, however, that region was returned to Bulgaria, and the village has since lain once again near the border, but the name stuck.
Even in Communist Romania, Vama Veche had the reputation of a non-mainstream tourist destination, which has only grown since the Romanian Revolution of 1989. During the communist era, concern for border patrol sight lines spared Vama Veche the development that occurred in other Romanian Black Sea resorts. It became a hangout for intellectuals; for reasons that are not exactly clear, the generally repressive regime of Nicolae Ceauşescu chose to tolerate this countercultural oasis, as long as people had their identity papers with them. Accommodations consisted of tents or rooms rented from peasants or fishermen. While camping is theoretically not permitted, to this day, many visitors or semi-permanent residents still stay in tents on the beach.

There is an unwritten rule that anyone visiting Vama Veche should always camp on the beach and boycott the recent built hotels and businesses in order to restore the place back to the old look and hippie vibe. Recent trends also include tourists taking a tiny fraction of the newly built paths as souvenirs in order to speed up the decaying, deteriorating process of Vama Veche's new commercial, business-orientated outlook.

Rate this item
(1 Vote)

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.